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Sourcebook for Cultivated Living

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    Our judges have selected the finalists, now you choose the winners. Vote for the finalists in each of 12 categories in the Considered Design Awards, on both Gardenista and Remodelista. You can vote once a day in each category, now through August 15.

    In the Best Hardscape category, which was open to both professional designers and amateur gardeners, our five finalists are Growsgreen Landscape & Design, Steve Martino, Elliott + Elliott Architecture, Alterstudio Architecture, and Lisa and Erik.

    Project 1

    Alterstudio Architecture | Austin, TX | Bunny Run Residence

    Design Statement: "The pool for the Bunny Run Residence was oriented to take maximum advantage of an unexpected greenbelt and lovely views offered at the rear of the property, while becoming the focal point for the main living areas and patios."

    Chosen by: Gardenista editor in chief Michelle Slatalla, who said: "The generous volume of the pergola and the dead-simple shape of the swimming pool beckon with the same promise as an oasis appearing in the desert."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Open living spaces of residence wrap around the pool court."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "View of pool from sunken lawn living area."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Master bedroom balcony overlooks pool edge."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Stucco volume captures the shadows from the trellis and pool reflections."


    Project 2

    Elliott + Elliott Architecture | Blue Hill, Maine | Hot Tub

    Design Statement: "The owners wanted a hot tub and terrace that would intrude minimally upon their natural setting. The solution is a whirlpool recessed into the ground and set flush with the stone pavers. It was carved out of two blocks of stone and assembled on site, merging seamlessly with its surroundings."

    Chosen by: Guest judge and garden designer Carolyn Mullet, who said of the project: "A subtle and beautiful use of materials. Expert craftsmanship. A hardscape that fits the site like a glove."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "View of hot tub and terrace from above."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards


    Project 3

    Lisa and Erik | Brooklyn, NY | Brooklyn Backyard

    Design Statement: "A neglected and overgrown Brooklyn backyard—littered with broken chain link fencing, dying trees, and rubbish—was reimagined and reborn, starting with extensive hardscaping. Despite being in a very urban setting, the space now has an outdoorsy flair but feels sophisticated and usable."

    Chosen by: Michelle Slatalla, who commented: "Leafy, green, and cool are three adjectives one doesn't typically associate with Brooklyn in summertime. The triumph of this project is it makes it unnecessary to flee the borough to find relief from the heat."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A towering wall of ivy makes for a wild and timeless yet urban feel."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Herringbone brickwork and planter were executed in a vintage brick to match the adjacent building."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Poured concrete tiers were stained a brick color and polished."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Bluestone pavers and a cedar shed contribute structure."


    Project 4

    Steve Martino | Phoenix, AZ | Multifunctional Sheds

    Design Statement: "Two connected contemporary garden sheds transformed the space from being a small exposed yard to being a large, private outdoor room. The narrow but long structures save floor space and give privacy to the small garden while serving multiple functions: viewing deck, fireplace, and storage." Photographs by Steve Gunther.

    Chosen by: Carolyn Mullet, who said, "Ingenious solution to a site privacy problem. An expert example of how hardscapes can create livable spaces. Choosing bold red finishes was brilliant."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Two unusual sheds dramatically transformed a small privacy-challenged backyard into a stylish outdoor room."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Fireplace shed completely overpowers privacy issue and creates a new reality of seclusion."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "View of stairs, shed, and cast-in-place bench; the design is practical and simple."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Yard has privacy and owner has a lookout to the mountains and back downtown."


    Project 5

    Growsgreen Landscape & Design | Oakland, CA | San Mateo Hardscape Garden

    Design Statement: "Before, this garden was not user-friendly with a huge lawn and small deck. By working with the grades and installing hardscape with a central planter and surrounding areas to be in and enjoy, the garden is transformed so that there is more usable space."

    Chosen by: Carolyn Mullet, who said, "A warm mix of modern materials define intimate spaces. Focal points are well crafted."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Broad view of garden from path and hot tub area." 

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Corten steel fountain with native no-mow lawn and glimpse of hot tub."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Detail of corten steel fountain and hardscaping."

    2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Round concrete fire pit and outdoor seating and curtains for warmth."

    Found your favorite? Vote once per day in each of 12 categories across both sites, now through August 15:

    More Stories from Gardenista


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    Gardening is not in my family or in my blood. But one fine morning nearly 30 years ago, the sun slanted seductively into my Toronto backyard and my garden suddenly seemed the most glorious place on earth. I knew that I could do something interesting here and—ho, ho—I would have complete control. In very short order, I moved from being a daily gardener to an all-day gardener. 

    My garden measured 19 by 136 feet, and I decided to divide the space into three sections (back then I didn’t know they were called garden rooms). Each one would be dedicated to plants that thrive under different conditions: morning sun, shade at noon, and afternoon sun. For me, that was a major revelation: Different plants need different light conditions. 

    Then, without even contemplating what a cataclysmic change it would make to my life, I switched from general journalism to only writing about my garden. Eventually that turned into 15 garden books for Canadians and one for everyone, Botanica North America (published in 2003, it's out of print but used copies are available, from $8.66 on Amazon).

    Photography by Andreas Trauttmansdorff for Gardenista.

    Marjorie Harris Toronto shade garden ; Gardenista

    Above: The view from my dining room, looking toward the back fence.

    My three garden rooms are the House Garden, where Japanese maples and evergreens abound; the Woodland Garden, home to massive hostas, hellebores, and arums; and Le Jardin de Refusé, which houses a small "hospital" for clients' plants that need to be nursed back to health.

      Marjorie Harris Toronto urban garden ; Gardenista

    Above: Le Jardin de Refusé started out as a place to put stuff I couldn’t deal with in other parts of the garden. It now has Japanese maples, Liquidambar ‘Slender Silhouette,’ and, opposite each other, a Liriodendron tulipifera ‘Fastigiata’ and Cercidiphyllym japonicum, a native and an exotic tree that look as if they belong together.

      Berberis thunbergii Helmond Pillar ; Gardenista

    Above: My Berberis thunbergii ‘Helmond Pillar,’ a great plant that no one seems to propagate any more.

    variegated hosta ; Gardenista

    Above: In the Woodland Garden, I went though a collect-every-hosta-possible phase. Now I live with this choice: The hostas get massive, I forget to divide them in spring, and then I can’t bear to whack at them later on. Despite their size, the hostas are in scale with everything else that lopes along.

       Marjorie Harris Toronto garden Japanese maple tree ; Gardenista

    Above: The view from the House Garden, with my house in the background. In the foreground is my first Japanese maple, an Acer palmatum ‘Dissectum Atropurpureum,’ which I bought 25 years ago for $20. It would cost thousands now. It needs constant haircuts and is pretty much perfect.

      Pyrus salcifolius pendula weeping silver pear tree ; Gardenista

    Above: Closeup of my Chiononanthus virginicus, or fringe tree.

    Conifer against fence Marjorie Harris Toronto garden ; Gardenista

    Above: A Sciadopitys verticillata grows against the fence.

    Marjorie Harris Toronto garden ginkgo Japanese maples ; Gardenista

    Above: A ginkgo tree (L) beneath the Japanese maples, and (R) a closeup of the ginkgo's leaves.

    As I changed, so did my garden. Now I know how to layer plants, what grows where, and when things will bloom. Back then I only knew how to love the plants. But my eye had been honed by years of working in an art gallery: Scale, harmony, and planes were things I understood. So why not apply them to gardening? This was like collecting and displaying sculpture. Gradually, I learned that succession is everything in garden design. 

    Kousa dogwood leaf Marjorie Harris Toronto garden ; Gardenista

    Above: A variegated dogwood lends pattern and texture to the garden.

    Over the years I've become more interested in foliage, patterns, and small moments rather than swathes of blooming color. I have a passion for trees—especially gingkoes, Japanese maples, dogwoods, anything native to the Carolinian forest. It’s impossible to have too many of these in a garden. I indulge my love of perennials when I design other people’s gardens: Let them do the deadheading. I just want to watch my living sculptures grow old with me.

    Hostas liriope Japanese maples Marjorie Harris Toronto garden ; Gardenista

    Above: Variegated hostas (R) and Hakonechloa (L) against a background of foliage.

    I'll buy any plant designated for any zone (I’m in US growing zone 5) and try to make it comfortable. But I’m fighting the impossible: I live on a flood plain once held in check by hundreds of trees. Most of these have long since been replaced by parking pads and patios. The flood happens annually and we're perpetually devising new ways to deal with it. I am Queen of the Sump Pumps. Then the water drifts away and we have dry shade the rest of the year. If a plant survives in my garden, it will survive anywhere.

      Marjorie Harris Toronto garden ; Gardenista

    Above: Pergolas designed by Toronto-based Earth Inc. support shade-tolerant Clematis ‘Betty Corning’ and C. fargesiodes

    Marjorie Harris front garden Toronto ; Gardenista

    Above: And then there's my front garden . . .

    Everyone lives cheek by jowl here in downtown Toronto, and we respect each other. Except for the guy who ripped out his garden and put in plastic grass. Him we don’t speak to. 

    For other Canadian gardens, see Earth Inc. in Toronto: A River Runs Through It and Steal This Look: An Airy Outdoor Shower.  And read more about Marjorie's garden at Marjorie Harris.

    Vote in the Gardenista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    The outdoor rug is often characterized by a polyurethane seal ornother weather-resistant coating, which for really exposed areas of the garden might make sense. But for the indoor/outdoor border (beneath an awning, a porch, or covered pergola), the coarse and sturdy threads of jute offer a natural alternative. The only prerequisite? Keep jute rugs clean and dry.

    Round

    Round Jute Rug from Pottery Barn | Gardenista

    Above: A spiral of sustainably harvested jute fibers, the Round Jute Rug in natural is $254 for the 8-foot size at Pottery Barn.

    Handwoven Lorne Rug from Anthropologie | Gardenista

    Above: The Handwoven Lorne Rug is an elongated oval shape; $248 for the 5-by-8-foot size at Anthropologie.

    Round Jute Rug from Serena & Lily | Gardenista

    Above: A hand-braided, Round Jute Rug inspired by Scandinavian design is $295 with an 8-foot diameter from Serena & Lily.

    Rectangular

    Chunky Hand-Braided Jute Rug from Restoration Hardware | Gardenista

    Above: The large and pale-colored Chunky Hand-Braided Jute Rug from Restoration Hardware has subtle irregularities and is available in a spectrum of neutrals; $1,595 for the 8-by-10-foot size.

    Dotted Jute Rug from West Elm | Gardenista

    Above: A subtle pattern of ivory dots is seen in the Dotted Jute Rug from West Elm; $299.99 for the 8-by-10-foot size.

    Heathered Jute Rug from Pottery Barn | Gardenista

    Above: A Natural Heathered Chenille Jute Rug is softened with rayon chenille woven throughout. This rug is best used in a covered area such a porch or even screened porch during rainy months; $509 for the 8-by-10-foot size from Pottery Barn.

    Charcoal Hand-Braided Jute Rug from Restoration Hardware | Gardenista

    Above: A chunky-knit rug woven tight for a softer hand feel: The Hand-Braided Jute Rug, shown in charcoal, is $995 and measures 8 by 10 feet.

    Jute Boucle Rug from West Elm | Gardenista

    Above: The Jute Boucle Rug is a simple, thin, and reversible option; $349 for the 8-by-10-foot size from West Elm.

    Raw Edged Flatweave Rug from Anthropologie | Gardenista

    Above: A blend of jute, cotton, and wool, the Raw-Edged Flatweave Rug is finished with a soft ribbed cotton hem; $598 for the 8-by-10-foot size at Anthropologie.

    Jute Border Rug from Serena & Lily | Gardenista

    Above: The Jute Border Rug features a light-colored contrasting border and tassel edges; $695 for the 8-by-10-foot rug at Serena & Lily.

    Natural Jute Rug from World Market | Gardenista

    Above: The nubby woven Natural Basket Weave Jute Rug is $269.99 at World Market.

    For more of our favorite outdoor rugs, see:

    Vote for the Gardenista Considered Design Awards 2015

    More Stories from Gardenista


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    Plants, like clothes, go in and out of style, says Michael Mauro, curator of the plant family collections at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Old-fashioned pom-pom hydrangeas come to mind.

    But new varieties of the plant, bred to bloom all summer long, have helped the grand dowager stage a comeback. "Now there's a hydrangea for every place and every garden," says Gloria Ward, president of the American Hydrangea Society.

    Ward says she has packed some 250 different hydrangea plants into her own 1/3 acre garden in Atlanta, Georgia—some in sun, some in sun, and several climbing up the walls of her brick house. Hydrangeas thrive in moist soil with good drainage, but beyond that require very little care besides deadheading and pruning, and attract few pests. "They're just so easy," says Ward.

    We asked experts Mauro and Ward to reveal their favorites (and tips for buying and growing these gorgeous plants). Here's their list of the 10 best hydrangeas:

    Photography by Julie Taylor Fitzgerald, courtesy of American Hydrangea Society except where noted.

    Annabelle

    Hydrangea arborescens Annabelle ; Gardenista

    Above: Hydrangea arborescens 'Annabelle' in bloom in a garden in September; the cultivar likes a bit of shade. Photograph by Urza via Flickr.

    "Fantastic," says Mauro. "Fabulous," says Ward. The mopheads of the arborescens species can grow up to 10 inches in diameter, starting out lime green, turning white, and then turning lime green again when dried, which they do very nicely.

    "The neat thing about Annabelle," says Ward, "is that they bloom on new wood, so it's perfect for us in the South. If you plant different species, it's like an insurance policy. Even if there's a late freeze, you still have some blooms on different plants." 

    Get it now: Buy this plant in full flower to make sure the blossoms are big and white, not flat and fuzzy. Shipped for fall planting, a Hydrangea Arborescens Annabelle shrub is $21.95 from White Flower Farm.

    Endless Summer

    Endless Summer Hydrangea ; Gardenista

    Above: Hydrangea 'Endless Summer' and Hydrangea 'Annabelle' grow alongside a path. Photograph via Dargan.

    "Today everyone has busy schedules," says Mauro, "and they want to plant something and see blooms all summer long." So a few years ago horticulturalists crossed a couple of varieties to come out with this classic "mophead" plant that, yes, blooms during the warm months on both old branches and new.

    Blooms can be white, blue, or lavender depending on the acidity of the soil, and can be various colors even on one bush. To change the color of the flowers, see Magic Trick: How to Make Your Hydrangea Change Color.

    Get it now: A Hydrangea Endless Summer is $19.95 from Wayside Gardens.

    BloomStruck

    Hydrangea Bloomstruck ; Gardenista

    Above: A Hydrangea 'BloomStruck'. Ward also recommends this long-blooming variety, which she believes has sturdier stems than Endless Summer.

    Get it now: A Hydrangea BloomStruck is $29.95 from White Flower Farm.

    Twist and Shout

    Hydrangea Twist and Shout ; Gardenista

    Above: Another adorably named plant, this one produces "lacecap" flowers and is also a remontant, or reblooming variety, that Ward says is her current favorite. It's critical, though, to deadhead the blooms in order to keep them blooming all season.

    Get it now: A Twist and Shout Hydrangea is $24.97 from Gardener Direct.

    Limelight

    Hydrangea Limelight ; Gardenista

    From the paniculata species, these have almost cone-shaped flower heads and also bloom on new wood. These bloom in full sun.

    Get it now: From Amazon, a Hydrangea Limelight shipped in a 4-inch post is $12.99.

    Midoriboshi Temari

    Hydrangea Midoriboshi Temari sawtooth ; Gardenista

    Above: Another of Mauro's favorites is this Japanese cultivar serrata hydrangea (also called 'Sawtooth'). Photograph by Clemson via Flickr.

    The small double petals look like little stars, and the blooms start out white and turn shades of pink, purple, blue, and even yellow—sometimes all on one plant. While all hydrangeas like lots of water, this breed in particular needs moist soil and afternoon or dappled shade.

    Get it now: A four-year-old Hydrangea Serrata 'Midoriboshi Temari' plant, cut back to a height of from 4 to 6 inches, is $18 from Amazon.

    Ayesha

    Hydrangea-Ayesha-Gardenista

    Above: This is a macrophylla that can grow as tall as 5 feet. Although not a rebloomer, its mopheads are made of little cupped petals and can be pink, blue or lavender, depending on the soil.

    Get it now: A two-year-old Hydrangea Macrophylla Ayesha is $19.95 from Hydrangeas Plus.

    Ruby Slippers

    Hydrangea Ruby Slippers ; Gardenista

    Above: Photograph by Gothic Librarian via Flickr.

    A cultivar of oakleaf hydrangea, the blossoms grow on dwarf bushes and turn, yes, a rosy ruby red as they age, while the leaves turn mahogany in the fall.

    Get it now: In a 1-gallon pot, a Hydrangea Quercifolia Ruby Slippers ships for fall planting; $29.95 from White Flower Farm.

    Snowflake

    Oakleaf hydrangea Snowflake ; Gardenista

    Above: Photograph by Chiots Run via Flickr.

    Another oakleaf, or quercifolia hydrangeathe beauty of these, according to Ward, is that they bloom white and age nicely, turning many different shades, even red and burgundy. The exfoliating bark adds another dimension, "interesting to watch throughout the season." Ward recommends leaving a lot of blossoms on the bush or stem. 'It's kind of prettier in the winter to look out and see the old blossoms. With snow and frost they take on a whole different perspective."

    Get it now: An Oakleaf Hydrangea Snowflake is $24 from Amazon.

    Petiolaris

    Hydrangea petiolaris climbing vine ; Gardenista

    Above: Photograph by Arrowlakelass via Flickr.

    This climbing hydrangea covers the brick walls of Ward's house, putting forth a lacy white bloom. It's a self clinger, so needs no extra supports, but Ward cautions that it can take a bit of time for the clingers to develop.

    Get it now: Shipped for fall planting, a Hydrangea Anomala Petiolaris in a 1-gallon pot is $29.95 from White Flower Farm.

    Hydrangea annabelle garden beds gravel paths brick edging ; Gardenista

    Above: Hydrangea 'Annabelle' is in full bloom in Gloria Ward's garden in Atlanta. 

    For plants, Ward likes to shop at Wilkerson Mill Gardens or Hydrangeas Plus.

    For more of our favorite hydrangeas, see:

    Vote for the Gardenista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    Their little farm was a "diamond in the rough" when blogger April of Wahsega Valley Farm and her husband, Mike, moved to a cabin in the Georgia countryside in 2006. Not for long, though. 

    In the vegetable garden, the couple built a beautiful DIY bean trellis—a bean tunnel, actually—using metal mesh and poles, available at most hardware stores. Here's how they did it:

    Photography via Wahsega Valley Farm.

    Before

    DIY vegetable garden bean tunnel ; Gardenista

    Above: A neat rectangular kitchen garden, divided into a checkerboard of planting beds sits against a rolling green backdrop.

    DIY vegetable garden building a bean tunnel ; Gardenista

    Above: In the spring of 2012, Mike built two bean tunnels to replace the previous year's smaller trellises, which had proved "not easy to get underneath to gather beans growing on the inside."

    DIY vegetable garden building a bean tunnel ; Gardenista

    Above: A few days after planting, "a few of the beans have grabbed onto the bean arbor," April says. 

    DIY vegetable garden building a bean tunnel ; Gardenista

    Above: Metal elbow fittings connect poles to create a canopy. For similar hardware, 3/4-inch Copper 90-Degree Elbows are $1.38 each from Home Depot. A skin of wire mesh covers the skeleton. A roll of 14-gauge Welded Wire (100 feet long by 4 feet wide) is $69.97 from Home Depot.

    After

    DIY vegetable garden building a bean tunnel ; Gardenista

    Above: In the summer of 2012, April (who is 5-foot-10) is able to stand upright under a tunnel to harvest beans growing on the underside.

    Here's a 2015 update from April: "The bean tunnel is still on our property but we no longer live there, unfortunately. It was wonderful for vining veggies. It was quite inexpensive and easy to put together and could easily hold the weight of most any vegetable, I'd think."

    DIY vegetable garden building a bean tunnel ; Gardenista

    Above: April liked to buy seeds from Southern Exposure Seed Exchange.

    DIY vegetable garden building a bean tunnel ; Gardenista

    Above: A 1-ounce packet of Dean's Purple Pole Snap Beans is $2.50. "When cooked, the purple beans turn green," says April.

    Are you growing your own food? For more ideas, see:

    Subscribe to Gardenista daily newsletter ; Gardenista

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    Listen up! Your weeds are trying to tell you something.

    Like all varieties of plants, individual weeds thrive in particular conditions. Some like it dry, others moist. Some prefer acidic soil, others thrive in more alkaline environments. Some will even tell you that your soil is perfect.

    So before you pluck and pull, take note. You can learn a lot about the growing conditions in your yard, based on which weeds are growing where. These 10 common weeds will reveal secrets about your soil: 

    Dandelions

    Dandelion weeds garden ; Gardenista

    Above: Dandelions are welcome here; learn why at The Garden of Magical Childhood. Photograph by Kendra Wilson.

    King of the weeds, dandelions thrive just about everywhere. These ubiquitous perennials love acidic soil. Their presence also may indicate an excess of potassium and/or a calcium deficiency. Finally, they thrive in compacted soil. There is a silver lining: dandelions' thick, long tap root, actually helps aerate the soil and bring calcium to the surface.

    The cure: Test for compaction by sticking a pencil or screwdriver into your soil. If it goes in easily, you don't need to aerate. If you meet with resistance, dig a patch of lawn with a shovel. If your grass root is only 1-2 inches deep, it's compacted and you need to aerate. 

    Plantains

    Plantain natural remedy plant ; Gardenista

    Above: Plantains can be your (ugly) medicinal friend; see more at First Aid Kit: 5 Essential Healing Plants.

    Used in traditional medicine to make a poultice against stings, rashes, and insect bites, plantains are none the less unsightly in the lawn and garden. Their presence indicates low fertility and high acidity. They also thrive in poorly drained, compacted soil.

    The cure: To prevent plantains, correct the soil imbalance, aerate soil, and raise the level of your lawn mower so tall grass blades can shade plantain's leaves.

    Crabgrass

    Digitaris crabgrass ; Gardenista  

    Above: Digitaria crabgrass photograph by Harry Rose via Flickr.

    Ever the opportunist, crabgrass thrives in both poor or very fertile soils, and will spring up in times of drought or excessive watering.

    The cure: To combat, raise the height of your mower to encourage "good" grass. Seed control also works with this annual' discourage germination by spreading cornmeal guten in the early spring.

    Ground Ivy

    Ground Ivy via Cornell University, Gardenista

    Above: Ground Ivy via NY State IPM Program at Cornell University.

    Ground Ivy (Glechoma hederacea), also known as "Creeping Charlie," is an aggressive weed that can quickly consume an unhealthy lawn. It thrives in areas with poor drainage, low fertility and lots of shade.

    The cure: Ground Ivy will take advantage of bald spots, so make sure your lawn and garden have a lush canopy (or mulch), and fertile, well-drained soil. A higher mowing height (from 2.5 to 3 inches) will also help.

    Annual Bluegrass

    Bluegrass weeds ; Gardenista

    Above: Poa Annua (bluegrass) photograph by Rasbak via Wikipedia Commons.

    An abundance of annual bluegrass is an indication that your soil is fertile, but most likely compacted and over watered and poorly drained.

    The cure: To combat, aerate and water less, raise your mower height, and prevent seeds from spreading by spreading a cornmeal gluten in spring.

    Chickweed

    common chickweed by Hugo via Wikipedia, Gardenista

    Above: Common Chickweed (Stellaria media); photograph by Hugo via Wikipedia Commons.

    Got chickweed in your garden? Goods news. That means it's highly fertile. But this spreading annual can also indicate poor drainage and too much watering as well as compacted soil.

    Lamb's Quarters

    lambs quarters by Wendell Smith via Flickr, Gardenista

    Above: Lamb's quarters by Wendell Smith via Flickr.

    Lamb's quarters (Chenopodium album) is another common garden weed whose presence indicates high fertility. And like chickweed, it can be eaten.

    The cure: Don't irrigate as often.

    Clover

    clover via NY State IPM Program at Cornell, Gardenista

    Above: Clover NY State IPM Program at Cornell University.

    Drought-resistant clovers are often added to lawns in dry areas. (Another benefit is clovers attract bees.) But if your soil is low on nitrogen, they can take over.

    The cure: To maintain the balance, increase your soil's fertility.

    Dockweed

    dock gardenista

    Above: Dockweed (Rumex) photograph via Outside Pride.

    Dockweed loves the bare patches especially those with wet, acidic soil.

    The cure: Perform a soil test to see if you need to adjust the pH balance of your soil. Allow soil to dry completely in between waterings, and plant a thick covering of healthy plants.

    Prostrate Knotweed

    prostrate knotweed via Oregon State, Gardenista  

    Above: Common or prostrate knotweed (Polygonum arenastrum); photograph via Oregon State.

    Common knotweed is one of those plants that thrives in the most meager soils—including the sandy, dry cracks in between paving stones. More specifically, it loves compacted soil with high acidity.

    The cure: Test soil to see if you need to adjust the acidity level. Aerate to relieve compaction.

    Now that you've learned form your weeds, it's time to eradicate them:

    Or you can eat your weeds:

    Vote for the Gardenista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    Our judges have selected the finalists, now you choose the winners. Vote for the finalists in each of 12 categories in the Considered Design Awards, on both Gardenista and Remodelista. You can vote once a day in each category, now through August 15.

    In the Best Edible Garden category, which was open to both professional designers and amateur gardeners, our five finalists are Judy Bown, Barnes Walker Ltd, Rob Maday Landscape Architecture, Kristin Korbin, and Betsy Spears.

    Project 1

    Betsy Spears | Mt. Washington, MA | Vegetable Garden with Fountain

    Design Statement: "Raised bed vegetable, herb, and flower garden with cruciform paths and center fountain. I say that I 'husband the wild.' So many plants (foxgloves, poppies, red kale, red mustard, camomile, violas) reseed themselves in different spots each year. I let them, with some editing along with planting rows of vegetables."

    Chosen by: Gardenista editor in chief Michelle Slatalla, who said: "The garden is a delightful marriage of edible and ornamental plants, with comfortable chairs perfectly positioned if you want to sit and watch the vegetables grow (beats TV, in my opinion)."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Fountain and view to the rock garden stone steps."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Overall view looking from the stone steps to the east."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Front to back: Italian pole beans, camomile, red mustard, chives, poppies, garlic, French beans, peas."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Sitting arrangement by the vegetable garden and barn."


    Project 2

    Kristin Korbin | Sonoma
, CA | Vineyard Family Garden

    Design Statement: "We converted an old greenhouse into a chicken coop and built raised planters for our vineyard in Sonoma, California. This project began with practical goals: We hoped for fresh eggs and vegetables for our large family meals, but designing and building this as a family has strengthened our bond."

    Chosen by: Guest judge and event designer David Stark, who said, "I love the relationship of the chicken coop and barn to the outdoor spaces—big and boxy and nicely proportioned to the broad strokes of the landscape. I also appreciate how the fire pit and seating area is defined by the raised planters. The proportion of that living space feels so right with the view it overlooks."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Reclaimed bespoke barn door made from turn-of-the-century homestead siding."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Chicken coop and Rhode Island Red chick tucked behind a meyer lemon and yuzu tree."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Flowering thyme, sorrel, and lemongrass soaking in the morning sunlight."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Concrete fire pit for outdoor cooking and entertainment sits under the glow of edison bulbs."


    Project 3

    Rob Maday Landscape Architecture | Santa Barbara, CA | Mediterranean Cottage Garden

    Design Statement: "A family of East Coast transplants found year-round garden inspiration in California's coastal climate. A modestly sized vegetable garden, stone fruit and citrus orchards, and lavender field provide the family with a continual harvest throughout the year."

    Chosen by: Michelle Slatalla, who had this to say about the project: "As an East Coast transplant myself, I think this design perfectly captures how exciting it feels to move to a mild Mediterranean climate where rosemary is a perennial and lettuce will grow year-round."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Simple stone-edged planters burst with vitality and diversity in this kitchen garden."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Gravel paths are softened by creeping thyme, spilling herbs, and flowering perennials."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Custom greenhouse boxes house veggie starters."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "When not roaming the garden, chickens find refuge in a chicken coop worth seeing."


    Project 4 

    Barnes Walker Ltd | Manchester, UK | Kitchen Garden, Cheshire

    Design Statement: "Designed as a functioning vegetable garden within an overall garden masterplan, also designed by Barnes Walker, this beautiful and functional space was created. Raised fruit and vegetable beds combine with a glasshouse, chicken roost, and fruit trees."

    Chosen by: David Stark, who commented, "I love the way the shapes of the raised beds define curved pathways and lead you through the property. Those reveals are dramatic and elegant in equal measure."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A tranquil yet highly organized and functional kitchen garden with raised beds and glasshouse."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The kitchen garden forms part of the wider estate providing food for the family year-round."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Traditionally designed, pegged oak forms the raised beds."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The chicken roost is a bespoke structure using a combination of ironwork and timber."


    Project 5 

    Judy Bown | Butleigh, Somerset, UK | The 12-Week Kitchen Garden

    Design Statement: "For Christmas, my boyfriend bought me a 'Constant Garden' from Rocket Gardens, essentially six deliveries over the spring and summer of plug-plants for a vegetable patch. With only grass and apple trees around the cottage, I had to act quickly and prepare some ground for the imminent first delivery." 

    Chosen by: David Stark, who said, "This garden is not only functional but romantic and visually stunning. The details—the stained, raised beds and the natural accessories—all work hard to make this garden a natural extension that complements the cottage perfectly."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "I stained the raised beds black, to show off the plants' colors, textures, and forms."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "I've avoided using plastics, and gone for natural materials that will weather with the seasons."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Although partly formal, I very much wanted it to complement the cottage and everyday life."

    Best Edible Garden Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The garden is primarily about good things to eat, and time spent outside with nature."

    Found your favorite? Vote once per day in each of 12 categories across both sites, now through August 15:

     

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    Last week we detailed the improvements brought to any garden with the addition of a pergola. This week in our second installment of our shade structures series, we're exploring the modern canopy: an instant and semi-permanent structure in the form of wide rectangles or triangles of fabric. Here are 10 ways to improve your summer backyard experience with a single piece of fabric.

    Cool Down the Backyard

    Outdoor Canopy from Styleroom.fi | Gardenista

    Above: A white triangular canopy attached to aluminum posts with springs on each end in the backyard of Finnish blogger Piijas of Styleroom.

    According to the Tree Foundation of Kern in California (urbanforest.org), “in the heat of the summer, temperatures are 10 degrees cooler under the shade of a mature tree.” Like a young tree, a canopy also can help, keeping concrete, furniture, and people cooler. Be sure to select a light-colored fabric that doesn’t absorb and retain summer heat.

    Block Harmful Ultraviolet Rays

    Greek Terrace in Santorini from Elle Decor Magazine | Gardenista

    Above: A recycled boat sail is used as a canopy on the terrace of owner Costis Psychas' house in Santorini, Greece from Elle Decor.

    Seek the shade during summer months, particularly at peak midday hours, under the shelter of a shade sail designed with UV-protective fabric (polyethylene and vinyl-coating) and oriented to block direct sunlight in your backyard. Be sure to couple your shady shelter with a proper sunscreen for full protection.

    Protect Furniture and Fabrics from Bleaching

    Gotland, Sweden Holiday Home on AirBnB | Gardenista

    Above: Vintage furniture in a Gotland summerhouse conservatory from Rose of Sweden: An Enchanted Seaside Summer Landscape.

    You invest in outdoor furniture, of course, with the intent to make good use of it all summer. When you turn over a cushion or move a potted plant at the end of the season, the bleaching effect of direct exposure becomes obvious. To a degree this can’t be helped, but it can be lessened with a shady canopy overhead.

    Keep Party Guests Comfortable

    Eatrip in Japan Photographed by Aya Brackett | Gardenista

    Above: Light is diffused in a sun-filled patio at Eatrip from Worth the Trip: Eatrip in Tokyo.

    A canopy above an outdoor dining table keeps guests, food, and drinks from melting in the glare of the setting sun.

    Protect Plants from Overexposure

    Partial Summer Shade Canopy | Gardenista

    Above: A triangular canopy covers the backyard entrance at a house designed by Outdoor Loft in the suburbs of Paris, France.

    Even plants that thrive in a healthy dose of sunlight don't always do best in extreme conditions. Keep shade plants beneath a canopy from spring to fall, and place sun-tolerant potted plants at the edges of the shelter to keep soil from drying out too fat.

    Keep the Glare Off Reading Materials

    Coolaroo Triangle Shade Sail | Gardenista

    Above: A 16-Foot Coolaroo Shade Sail in Desert Sand from Design Sleuth: Shade Sails.

    If you've ever pulled out your laptop, cell phone, or even a bright white book in the middle of a sunny day, you know the issue that arises with glare. For working or reading in the backyard, a sunshade blocks just the right amount of glare without giving up the breeze.

    Create a Privacy Screen

    Cote Maison Outdoor Space Photograph by Castorama | Gardenista

    Above: A colorful terrace photographed by Castorama on Côté Maison.

    This improvement is particularly useful to the urban dweller whose outdoor space may be flush against a neighbor's or revealed in clear view from another, higher building. Build privacy with a single canopy or layer multiple shade sails.

    Cast a Colorful Glow

    Cedar Mill Garden Designed by Debbie Brooks | Gardenista

    Above: A bright yellow canopy is stretched from the side of a house to stakes in the garden at the Ceder Mill Garden in Portland, Oregon designed by Debbie Brookes. Photograph via Danger Garden.

    Like the spirit of a brightly colored Fermob chair, fabric canopies (available in a host of colors) allow you to live for a few months in the glow of canary yellow or ocean blue cast. It's like living in the tint of a camera filter.

    Create a DIY Backyard 

    Nap Garden Cafe and Shop Photographed Yoko Inoue | Gardenista

    Above: Photograph of a Madras plaid fabric canopy at Nap in Tokyo from A Gardening Shop Plus Cafe in the Mountains of Japan.

    Create a frame using from two to four sticks or poles as posts. Stake the posts in buckets of cement, or use rock sculptures to weigh down a piece of fabric strung over an existing frame. The impermanence of a canopy allows for stress-free experimentation and creativity.

    Offer Shelter from the Storm

    Shade Sail Rooftop Photographed by David Robert Elliot for Dwell | Gardenista

    Above: A rooftop of shade sails by John DeSalvo Design in Chicago from Come Sail Away on Dwell.

    In areas familiar with the sudden summer storm, outdoor spaces such as an open backyard or rooftop can feel too exposed to the elements. With a durable polyester, polyethylene, or vinyl canopy, you can keep dry while storms pass overhead.

    For more shade ideas, see our posts:

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    We learned this young: When the third little pig chose brick, he knew what he was doing. As a building material, brick has stood the test of time. It's hardworking, aesthetically versatile, easily maintained, and affordable. Although it's sometimes considered a formal look for a patio, that depends on the type of bricks, the color, the pattern, and the application.

    Here's everything you need to know to design a brick patio:

    Julie Carlson's mossy brick patio ; Gardenista

    Above: Remodelista editor-in-chief Julie Carlson likes a mossy look; here's her brick patio in Mill Valley, CA. Photograph by Michelle Slatalla.

    What types of bricks are good for a patio?

    Most bricks are composed of clay soil combined with lime and sand. Although red bricks are the most common, bricks come in many colors, including cream, grey, tan, buff, pink, brown, and black.

    Clay brick colors ; Gardenista

    Above: The color varies according to several factors: the relative proportion of lime, the color of the sand, and the temperature and duration of the firing. One strong attribute is that brick color doesn't fade with age or wear.  

    Steel Factory Windows and Doors, Gardenista

    Above: In Amsterdam, designer Maurius Haverkamp's home in a former warehouse is designed around a patio with walls of glass and steel that send sunlight into all areas of the house. See more at Bohemian Grove: 11 Free Spirit Facades with Steel Factory Windows.

    If you're looking for a weathered look and don't want to wait years to get it, you can buy tumbled bricks. Used bricks are another option—try searching under "building materials" on Craigslist. But don't buy unless you're assured that any residual mortar has been cleaned off. Whatever you choose, make sure they're bricks that will work well for a patio—they're not too porous, for example, or prone to flaking in freezing temperatures. If in doubt, check with a stonemason or stoneyard worker.

    What are some patterns for laying a brick patio?

    Your choice of pattern will be largely determined by how much space you have and how much money you want to invest. Here are the most common patterns, from the least expensive and labor-intensive to the most:

    • Running bond just means bricks laid in simple rows. Concentric squares or rectangles are variations on running bond; these are appealing if you have enough space to show them off. In smaller spaces, a concentric pattern can look busy.
    • Basketweave is a classic pattern that's slightly more labor-intensive than running bond. It comes in many variations. To make the pattern work, you'll need bricks that are twice as long as they are wide (plus any mortar joint). That also reduces the number of bricks that will need to be cut.
    • Herringbone is a timeless look that works well for both pathways and patios. A herringbone set at 45 degrees is somewhat more expensive because the bricks on the edges all need to be cut. Herringbone set at 90 degrees involves less cutting.

    Common paving patterns for brick ; Gardenista

    Above: Common brick patterns, courtesy of Rubio's Masonry and Construction.

    Should a brick patio be set in sand or mortar?

    There are two schools of thought; the techniques achieve different looks. A sand-set patio is less expensive, flexible (which is good if you live in a frost-prone area), and easily repaired. However, it's likely to shift over time and get bumpy. The mortar-set patio is not flexible, but will remain flat in any climate. Also, the mortar discourages weeds and ants.

    If you choose sand, make sure you look for a type of sand, gravel, or grit that won't shift too much, and will repel ants. If you choose mortar, ask your contractor not to make the mortar joints any wider than half an inch.

    Choose sand-set if you love the look of moss between bricks. It is possible to get moss to grow between mortar-set bricks, but it won't do so as readily.

    Hardscaping 101: Brick Patios | Gardenista

     Above: Another view of the Connecticut patio designed by Doyle Herman Design Associates. The brick color was carefully selected to blend with the stone fireplace.

    How do I care for a brick patio?

    The easiest way to get rid of any weeds sprouting up between the bricks is simply to pour boiling water directly on the plants. If your patio is in a heavily shaded area, algae and mold may appear on the brick. This causes no harm but can be unsightly. To remove the growth, use diluted vinegar and a scrub brush. Tougher stains might respond to hydrogen peroxide. The easiest way to clean a brick patio is by power washing, but the pressure should be no higher than 3,000 pounds per square inch.

    Brick courtyard patio Paris ; Gardenista

    Above: In a former printing factory in Paris, garden designer Jacques Leseur softened the industrial backdrop with flowering wisteria vines and cut leaf Japanese maple trees. For more, see Steal This Look: An Industrial Chic Parisian Courtyard

    How much does a brick patio cost?

    A mortar-set brick patio costs about the same as bluestone: around $20 per square foot, installed. (Most bricks cost from $1 to $1.20 each; you need about four and a half bricks per square foot.) A sand-set patio will cost you less: from $12 to $15 per square foot.  

    Hardscaping 101: Brick Patios | Gardenista

    Above: This handsome brick patio in Belgium is laid in a classic herringbone pattern, with a "soldier" border. Photograph from Exceptional Gardens by Wim Pauwels.

    Brick Recap:

    • After deciding on a color, consider talking to a specialist about the best type of brick for your area.
    • Choose your paving pattern, such as running bond, basketweave, or herringbone, with spatial and financial constraints in mind.
    • Sand-set brick is less expensive, flexible, and easy to repair, but may become uneven over time.
    • Mortar-set brick is more expensive, but remains flat, repels ants, and is less prone to weeds.
    • Brick is relatively easy to maintain. Vinegar, hydrogen peroxide, or power-washing will keep it looking good. 
    • Mortar-set brick costs $20 per square foot, installed, while sand-set is from $12 to $15.  

    Considering other materials for a patio? See our Hardscaping 101 archives for Bluestone, Limestone, and Decomposed Granite.

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    In the bee-sung heart of Debra Hill's rambling Oakland garden, waist deep in borage, calendula, and nasturtium, and flanked by walls of scarlet runner beans, you might for a long afternoon forget that two busy urban thoroughfares are just a stone's throw away. 

    Photography by Sylvia Linsteadt.

    scarlet runner beans gardenista

    Above: The place is a wild urban wonderland where nature is given near full rein, checked here and there by Hill's expertly indulgent hand. When she and her husband bought the 1889 Victorian 10 years ago in the Temescal neighborhood of Oakland, the yard—a little more than a quarter acre, and still the original lot—was a chaos of shrubbery and a formidable, foot-thick carpet of morning glory.

      Blue house grape & fig, gardenista

    Above: Previously, the house and yard had been tended for almost a century by the same Italian family, who raised meat rabbits in the garden, leaving behind prodigiously rich soil, and planted the orange, fig, and black walnut trees that still drop sweet fruit come winter and summer. Perhaps it's the strata of rabbit droppings, or the fact that the perennial Temescal Creek once flowed around the corner, making the site of the garden an old silty floodplain. Or maybe it's Debra's free-wheeling approach to tending her land, letting plants mostly self-sow and flourish where they choose, save in her sprawling kitchen garden plot, and the flowers planted throughout for beauty and for bees. Whatever the case, her yard hums with a near-feral abundance. 

    hugefennel gardenista

    Above: Fennel grows 10 feet tall, nasturtiums bust out leaves far bigger than a human face, and the calendula blooms fervently all year round. 

    Calendula Gardenista

    Above: The blooms of showy Papaver hybridium poppies (in numerous colors) flash their bright petals and seduce many bees before quickly going to seed, forming pods as magical to look at as their flowers. 

    poppy pods gardenista

    Above: Hill was always enchanted by the idea of a garden, ever since she tended her own as a girl. The idea that out of no more than a patch of soil, a bit of water and sun, and a handful of seeds, you could reap things like corn, melons, peaches, beautiful flowers—this seemed as magical as making ice cream. A pure treat.

    Hill had no official training as a gardener before purchasing the house and lot, but rather learned everything by trial and error, experimentation, enthusiasm, and the help of many books.

    apricot tree ladder gardenista

    Above: During the four months between purchase and move in, Hill let her imagination go wild, choosing numerous species of fruit trees to plant—the apples, pears, plums, peaches, apricots, and figs which now rim the garden's perimeter.

    plums gardenista

    Above: Satsuma plums ripen later than the flush of sweet apricots or yellow peaches, extending the fruit-gathering season well into late summer.

    green apples gardenista

    Above: The many varieties of apples—from Cinnamon Spice to Golden Russet, Hauer Pippin to Gravenstein—wait until autumn, heavy on their boughs.

    motherwort gardenista

    Above: At the ankles of the many fruit trees, Debra has encouraged good bee forage for her hives, including motherwort (shown above, a favorite of bees and also an excellent medicinal plant), flowering radish, numerous species of salvia, sunflower, parsley, mint, clarkia, penstemon, tidy tips, poppies, and yarrow. 

    artichoke gardenista

    Above: The iridescent blooms of artichokes are another bee-favorite.

    hawthorn the rabbit gardenista

    Above: The angora rabbit Hawthorn, who calls the garden home, also relishes many of the plants. He is kept and groomed for his lustrous wool (a spinner's dream) by two tenants who live in a separate unit in the old house, and who share the rambling yard.  

    urban beeyard gardenista

    Above: Inside the chicken coop are four beehives amid fig branches and roses, and beneath a yellow peach. Debra and her family collect the honey at the end of the summer, and sell some on the street to neighbors. 

    feral greenhouse motherwort gardenista

    Above: In a charming greenhouse at the back of the garden, half inside the chicken coop and flanked by Queen Anne's lace, red Russian kale, motherwort, and olive trees (Frantoio, Maurino, Leccino and Mission olives grace the garden), Hill sprouts all of the seedlings for her sun-baked kitchen garden. This always includes a rich variety of tomatoes—Black Kris, Early Girl, Jory, Bel Monte Pear, Islets, Sungella, Green Zebra and Margarita, to name a few. While the rest of the garden is kept with wildness in mind, Hill tends the kitchen garden with an eye for productivity. 

    the kitchen garden gardenista

    Above: To prep the beds for a summer of tomatoes, squash, beans, corn, peppers, and endless rows of kale, Hill plants a cover crop of alfalfa, vetch, and oats in late autumn, then cuts it back come early spring and lays it, layered with newspaper and straw, to settle into the earth and nourish the soil. In late spring, when the young tomato seedlings are ready, she tucks them deep into the soil, through layers of nitrogen-rich mulch, and watches them shoot up toward the sky. 

    sunflowers & corn gardenista

    Above: Corn, sunflowers, and runner beans grow exuberantly, warmed by day-long sun in the back of the yard.

    amaranth gardenista

    Above: Hopi red dye amaranth is a yearly volunteer in the kitchen garden, beautiful to look at and productive too—it drops thousands of tiny black seeds which make a delicious cooked grain. 

    haybales gardenista

    Above: Hill brings in truckloads of hay a few times a year to mulch the garden and to cover the paths, lending the place an air of a cozy, footloose farm, and keeping the walkways delineated and soft, good for the barefoot games of children. 

    ; Grape and Kiwi Arbor

    Above: Grapes and kiwis shade a mid-yard arbor, and birdhouse gourds, grown here, house yearly broods of Bewick's wrens. Amid the noise and haste of urban Oakland, Hill has succeeded in her dance with the wild, creating a space where plants and humans alike can flourish, naturally at ease. 

    For more of our favorite East Bay gardens, see:

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    San Francisco Bay Area-based o2 Treehouse specializes in designing and building "arbor-textual creations" for residences and commercial properties.

    Since 2006, when founder Dustin Feider coupled his background in furniture design with his passion for outdoor climbing to start building treehouses, he and his crew have built dozens all over California. 

    In September of 2014, the team built a two-story structure on 30 acres in Calistoga near Northern California wine country. For a client who wanted a treehouse that complemented a ranch-style house just 5 yards away, Feider came up with a design that includes interior space, a slide, a swing, and a cantilevered platform.  Let's take a look around.

    o2 Treehouse, Two Story Treehouse in Calistoga, California | Gardenista

    Above: From initial sketch to completion, the project (which measures 27 feet long) took six weeks. The structural beams are made from kiln-dried Douglas fir and the siding is coated cedar.

    Most treehouses are suspended by cables, but this particular design required a different setup to ensure it would withstand the elements. To allow the tree to sway normally in the event of heavy wind, the structural beams sit on bolts.

    Before

    In the process of building a two-story treehouse in Calistoga, designed and built by o2 Treehouse | Gardenista

    Above: Laying out the bones of the building. 

    In the process of building a two-story treehouse in Calistoga, designed and built by o2 Treehouse | Gardenista

    Above: The treehouse in its final stage. After installation comes the process of caring for the tree by aerating the soil. This guarantees minimal damage to the tree and its roots, which can become suffocated in compacted soil created during construction.

    After

    Galvalume Roof, o2 Treehouse, Two Story Treehouse in Calistoga, California | Gardenista

    Above: Fabricated offsite, the roof is made from Galvalume panels, a mixture of steel and aluminum.

    o2 Treehouse, Two Story Treehouse in Calistoga, California | Gardenista

    Above: Quarter-inch cable railings line the cantilever. 

    o2 Treehouse, Two Story Treehouse in Calistoga, California | Gardenista

    Above: The structure was built around the canopy to ensure that visitors had a view of a "wonderful part of the tree," said Feider.

    Treehouse Interior, o2 Treehouse, Two Story Treehouse in Calistoga, California | Gardenista

    Above: The second-level interior.  

    Marine-Grade Mesh, o2 Treehouse, Two Story Treehouse in Calistoga, California | Gardenista

    Above: Feider enlisted a local weaver to create a floor mesh from marine-grade rope. 

    For similar projects, take a look at Little Red Treehouse in the Big Woods and Architect Visit: An Indestructable Cabin on Stilts by Olson Kundig

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    To celebrate summer, the Remodelista editors are living the simple life—with new tips for storage in a small kitchen, instant backsplash wallpaper, and the world's prettiest brass tap:

    Kitchen sink storage shelf dish drainer ; Gardenista

    Above: Small kitchen, big storage ideas. Justine reveals 6 Ways to Maximize Kitchen Storage Space.

    Brooklyn handprinted pillows and throws Susan Connor ; Gardenista  

    Above: Izabella visits the Bushwick studio of self-taught textiles designer Susan Connor in Brooklyn Handprinted Pillows and Throws.

    Silo restaurant zero waste Brighton UK ; Gardenista  

    Above: Has Julie discovered the world's most sustainable restaurant? See Silo in Brighton, a Zero Waste Restaurant for the Future.

    Perrin Rowe brass faucet

    Above: "We like to make the kitchen design process easy for our customers so they don't have to make too many decisions," says Helen Parker, creative director of British kitchen company deVol. See what she means in Found: The Perfectly Aged Brass Kitchen Faucet.

    Kitchen wallpaper backsplash ; Gardenista

    Above: Rental kitchen fix: instant backsplash. Julie sleuths and finds new Stain-Resistant Wallpaper from the Netherlands.

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    Our judges have selected the finalists, now you choose the winners. Vote for the finalists in each of 12 categories in the Considered Design Awards, on both Gardenista and Remodelista. You can vote once a day in each category, now through August 15.

    In the Best Outdoor Living Space category, which was open to both professional designers and amateur gardeners, our five finalists are Greg and Rainy Smith, Earth Inc., Leslie Needham Design, Daniel Nolan for Flora Grubb Gardens, and Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects. 

    Project 1

    Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects | Bridgehampton, NY | Hasenacher

    Design Statement: "Situated with an optimal view of the farmland, lake, and city beyond, the pool house is conceived as an open pavilion with built-in amenities for true relaxation: cooking, lounging, dining, and view gazing. In case of inclement weather, the pavilion can be completely enclosed by deploying the folding glass doors."

    Chosen by: Guest judge and event designer David Stark, who said: "This is a perfect home/garden for entertaining. The proportions of the flat roof of the porch and its relationship to the sleek, elegant pool are quite nice. Why ever go inside?!" 

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "View from pool terrace of the lake and city beyond."

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Farmhouse pool pavilion opened up for night time entertaining."

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Custom picnic table harvested from local trees."

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Stone terrace made from indigenous stone."


    Project 2

    Daniel Nolan for Flora Grubb Gardens | San Francisco, CA | Octavia Terrace

    Design Statement: "I don't think my client was expecting me to say 'Dior 2013 Spring Collection' when I was meeting with him to discuss his project, but we were standing in his city terrace that was so stark that I immediately thought of the show. The set was designed as an homage."

    Chosen by: Gardenista editor in chief Michelle Slatalla, who commented: "The equivalent of the little black dress is the little white garden, and this one gracefully brightens and warms a severe facade."

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The terrace was inspired by the 2013 Dior Spring Collection."

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The look is minimal but warm, and provokes both meditation and reflection." 

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Undulating Buxus, punctuated with Acer 'shishigashira' all planted in matching concrete spheres."


    Project 3

    Leslie Needham Design, LLC | Bedford, NY | A Studio for Inspiration

    Design Statement: "As a landscape designer, inspiration comes from the outdoors. My at-home studio (formerly a wagon shed attached to the house) offers large views and quick passage to the terraces and gardens around the house. These views and walks through the gardens are a constant source of creative motivation."

    Chosen by: David Stark, who had this to say about the project: "I love the romance and the feeling of discovery in this garden. The relationship of the home/studio to the landscape is seamless and the pull to get lost within the garden is strong. Lovely." 

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The studio opens up to the gardens with two pairs of large French doors."

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The main terrace of the house is a few short steps from the studio."

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Across the grass from the studio are stone steps to the orchard."

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The steps are planted with herbs, iris, sedums and mint: happy re-seeders."


    Project 4

    Earth Inc. | Toronto, Ontario, Canada | The Meadows

    Design Statement: "Exiting the house, you enter a honed concrete dining patio and on toward a sunken fire pit lounge. A wood/I-beam boardwalk takes you across a water basin fed by three copper spigots set into a wood textured concrete wall. The boardwalk continues through a meadow of mass planted Switch Grass."

    Chosen by: David Stark, who said: "At first glance, this garden feels quite simple, but I appreciate that it's anything but. It is a very convincing fantasy and a really fabulous space for entertaining. Exotic and unexpected!" 

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "View from the sunken fire pit patio across the water feature and boardwalk."

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards


    Project 5

    Greg and Rainy Smith | Manhattan Beach, CA | Friday Wine Night Retreat

    Design Statement: "In an effort to reduce water use, we removed our lawn and created a space that is an extension of our home and has become our social gathering spot for our family's favorite Friday Wine Nights."

    Chosen by: Michelle Slatalla, who said: "With string lights, built in seating, and a fire pit, this is the ultimate outdoor party room. With contrasting textures and the warmth of wood, nobody misses the lawn (or the higher monthly water bill).

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Fire pit, bocce ball mini-court, sitting area."

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A smaller playing field doesn't ruin the game one bit!"

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Simon is a fan of the area as well!"

    Outdoor Living Space Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A mini-court for the minis!"

    Found your favorite? Vote once per day in each of 12 categories across both sites, now through August 15:

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    Read on to see what caught our attention this week.

    Melon Salad by Heidi Swanson | Gardenista

     

    Brunswick Garden via Design Files | Gardenista

    • Above: An artist's tiny garden in Melbourne. Photograph by Eve Wilson. 
    • Cookies that combine flowers and art. 

    Pangean Lounge Chair, Traveling chair | Gardenista  

    Instagram and Pinterest Pick of the Week

    Gardenista Instagram Pick: @jerseyicecreamco

    • Above: An overgrown facade in London captured by Jersey Ice Cream Co (@jerseyicecreamco).

    Gardenista Pinterest Pick of the Week: Marble and Milkweed

    • Above: Marble and Milkweed's In the Wild pinboard has us planning an escape to the forest. 

    Want more Gardenista? View our Simple Life issue and take a look at Remodelista's Simple Life issue, too. 

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    Nobody wants to be indoors in glorious weather. We're cooking, showering, and lounging outside. Join us for a week of celebrating The New Outdoor Room:

    Table of Contents: The New Outdoor Room; Gardenista

    Above: From WWOO Outdoor Kitchens, Dutch practicality marries with modern style. For more, see Steal This Look: The Ultimate Outdoor Kitchen.

    Monday

    Built in sofa patio outdoor room ; Gardenista

    Above: Photograph by Matthew Williams for Gardenista.

    Izabella is designing new built-in seating for her deck; see the ideas that inspired her most in this week's Roundup post. Meanwhile, see Scandi-style built-in seating in From Sweden with Love: A Sea Captain's Romantic Villa.

    Tuesday

    outdoor deck oslo norway cafe string lighting ; Gardenista

    Above: Low-cost details keep Norwegian blogger Nina Holst's stylish deck on budget; Alexa sources everything (yes, even the poufs) necessary to Steal This Look.

    Wednesday

    Vincent van Duysen Pool in Kortrijk, Belgium | Gardenista

    Above: What makes a swimming pool look modern? Alexa's investigation takes her into dark waters in this week's post on the latest trends in Swimming Pool Design.

    Thursday

    Outdoor kitchen Italy ; Gardenista

    Above: An outdoor kitchen doesn't have to be fancy, it just has to marry function with form. We round up our favorite barebones Outdoor Kitchens to illustrate just how simple it can be to set up an instant food prep station without sacrificing style.

    Friday

    Outdoor shower ; Gardenista

    Above: Nothing's nicer than a shower outdoors. And installation doesn't have to be complicated. Janet demystifies the plumbing process in this week's installment of Hardscaping 101.

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    We're in the process of gutting our backyard. One of the design elements we're adding is a large deck with a built-in, U-shaped sofa—a spot for the family to lounge and unwind. In addition to the great lounging benefits, a built-in design saves us from having to splurge on new outdoor furniture. Here are 10 built-in sofas that have me convinced I'm on the right path to relaxation.

    vumbura-plains-wide-stilted-water-deck-gardenista  

    Above: A U-shaped outdoor seating at the Vumbura Plains Camp in Botswana, designed by Silvio Rech and Lesley Carstens. (first spotted in the book The New Safari.)

    Home of Derek I Gardenista

    Above: The home of entrepreneur Derek Mattison in LA (originally designed by modernist post-war architects Buff & Hensman) was renovated by Pamela Shamshiri of LA-based design firm Commune. The deck with a built-in sofa and comfortable cushions overlooks an LA canyon. Photography by Richard Powers for Yatzer.

    Designed-by-Anthony-Wyer-and-Associates-Gardenista  

    Above: Anthony Wyer and Associates (a Sydney-based landscape design firm), custom-built the bench and deck for the owners of this home in Edgecliff, NSW Australia.

    East House by Built Environment Practice I Gardenista

    Above: The East House by Built Environment Practice (an Australia-based firm) designed a deck that extends along the home's upper fence. 

    Provincetown, MA cottage and deck I Gardenista  

    Above: Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, this Provincetown, Massachusetts cottage features built-in-seating along the deck perimeter. Photography from New England Home Magazine.

    A sofa built along a fence in Sweden I Gardenista  

    Above: A sofa built below a horizontal fence. Spotted at Bungalow 5, via Swedish magazine Hus & Hem.

    The outdoor Patio of Australian designer Shareen Joel I Gardenista  

    Above: At the weekend home of Australian designer Shareen Joel a wooden bench (covered in a dark blue cushion) is backed up against a black-painted facade. Photography by Sharyn Cairns via Home Life.

    L-Shaped built-in Sofa into Deck via VT Wonen I Gardenista  

    Above: A U-shaped sofa with an intentional hole added to make room for an ivy plant to grow. Via Dutch VT Wonen

    The outdoor patio of artist Ara Katz in Venica, LA I Gardenista  

    Above: The courtyard of artist Ara Katz and her partner Chris Ovitz in Venice, LA, features a low-to-the-ground pallet-like sofa with large white cushions for the ultimate lounge area. Photograph via Because I'm Addicted.

    Patio Sofa with White Cushions and String Lights I Gardenista  

    Above: A patio sofa covered in white cushions. The string lights add a cozy feeling to the nook. Found via Norwegian blog Interior og Boligmessen.

    For more outdoor patio inspiration, see:

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    Our judges have selected the finalists, now you choose the winners. Vote for the finalists in each of 12 Considered Design Awards categories, on both Gardenista and Remodelista. You can vote once a day in each category, now through August 15.

    In the Best Professionally Designed Landscape category, our five finalists are Outer Space Landscape Architecture, Rees Roberts & Partners, Steve Martino, Arterra Landscape Architecture, and Flora Grubb Gardens.

    Project 1

    Rees Roberts & Partners | New York, NY | Croatian Tower Garden

    Design Statement: "This landscape surrounds a 15th-century Croatian tower that has been restored and converted into a house. The design creates a series of distinct outdoor spaces while seeking to preserve the existing planted and natural landscape, which includes a centuries-old olive grove and rambling stone walls."

    Chosen by: Guest judge and garden designer Carolyn Mullet, who commented, "Stunning location with unexpected architecture. A design that shows respect for place through restraint. Inviting, new living spaces combine comfortably with restored stone walls and existing trees."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "New trees and landscape features were added strategically to enhance and protect the existing flora."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "An intimate outdoor sitting area is used daily for evening gin and tonics."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The cool silvery green tones of herbs and other plantings complement the stone ruins throughout."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The variegated heights and densities of the landscape mimic the site's built environment."


    Project 2

    Arterra Landscape Architects | San Francisco, CA | Homestead on Whiskey Hill

    Design Statement: "A young family with a love of the land wanted to turn a tumbledown, overgrown hillside into a contemporary agrarian setting for entertaining and recreation. Equally important was celebrating the site through preserving all native oak trees and accentuating the panoramic views." Photographs: Michele Lee Willson.

    Chosen by: Gardenista editor in chief Michelle Slatalla, who said: "The design achieves that elusive goal, of taming the land (so people can use it) while preserving important elements of the natural landscape (so people can enjoy it)."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Our clients were our greatest inspiration for this gracious and comfortable landscape."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Paths meander through the garden to areas for recreation, like the bocce court and stables."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The outdoor kitchen by the pool house is a gathering spot for the family."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "An indoor/outdoor fireplace is a focal point when evening falls."


    Project 3

    Steve Martino | Phoenix, AZ | Baja Garden

    Design Statement: "This livable desert garden evolved over a span of four years by resolving a list of site problems. Woven into this garden is a strong representation of the region’s ecology: Native plants link the garden to the ecological processes of the site." Photographs: Steve Gunther.

    Chosen by: Carolyn Mullet, who said: "Amazing color palette and bold sculptural forms. The native plantings settle the design into the site perfectly."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Juxtaposing manmade elements against a naturalistic landscape gives a connection to the site and region."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Rebar ‘spines’ extending from the tilted outdoor shower wall mimic the Ocotillo plants."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The 'secret' Baja Garden fire pit with rebar heat-sink."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The sunken Baja Garden was inspired by the ancient kiva ruins of the Southwest."


    Project 4

    Flora Grubb Gardens | San Francisco, CA | Mediterranean Retreat

    Design Statement: "Challenge: To create a new outdoor living space in a garden that prior was never used."

    Chosen by: Michelle Slatalla, who had this to say about the project: "Essentially, this project achieved what we all dream of: it add a brand-new room of living space onto a home—and made that space feel as welcoming as an indoor living room."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A specimen Aloe barbarae is the focal point for this Mediterranean palette."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A new ipe deck gave the outdoor area an additional 14 feet of living space."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Detail shot of Calamondrin, Elegia capensis, Rosmarinus bowles, Euphorbia Ascot Rainbow, and Olea Bonita."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The arched seating area backdropped by a three-stain process on an existing concrete wall."


    Project 5

    Outer Space Landscape Architecture | San Francisco, CA | Northern California Modern

    Design Statement: "This modern design incorporates clean lines and mass plantings, and maximizes space by utilizing all reaches of the property. The rear includes a bocce court, trampoline, zip line and sportscourt, dining areas, a kitchen with counter seating and a fire pit, extensive area for edibles, and bird, bee, and butterfly habitat."

    Chosen by: Carolyn Mullet, who said, "Modern in form, materials, and plantings. A garden that makes one think of easy entertaining and family fun."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Doors open on two sides of the living room to entertainment area (shown) and private courtyard."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "An arbor creates shaded seating for watching bocce."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Native grasses complement modern elements including a basalt gabion wall and frosted glass screen."

    Best Landscape Finalist in the 2015 Gardenista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A frosted glass screen defines the entry and creates a private courtyard off the living room."

    Found your favorite? Vote once per day in each of 12 categories across both sites, now through August 15:

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    Consider that in the northernmost parts of Scandinavia the growing season is 60 days long. The rest of the year is basically a prelude to or recovery from winter. This is all you need to know to understand the local impulse to spend every possible moment living outdoors, wallowing in nature. A picnic table, outdoor tub, and stylish privy will get you through the summer months just fine.

    These are not people who take their gardens for granted. Nor do they fuss over them, or try to force nature to assume an artificial symmetry. Self-sowing wildflowers are rampant. Manicured lawns and precisely pruned shrubs, not so much.

    Wondering how to achieve a similarly relaxed and ecstatic relationship with your own garden? Here are 10 tips:

    Move to the Outdoors

    Dartboard barn door Kotipalapeli; Gardenista

    Above: Photograph via Kotipalapeli.

    Live outdoors as much as possible. For your indoor rooms—kitchen, shower, bedroom, living room—create corresponding outdoor spaces to which you can decamp in summer. These don't have to be overly complicated or costly; an outdoor kitchen can consist of a couple of shelves under an eave where you store plates and cups (near an outdoor spigot for washing up), a dining table and chairs, and a grill.

    Recycle, Reuse, Reclaim

    DIY pallet chair ; Gardenista  

    Above: Lounge chairs made of recycled pallets. For instructions, see DIY: Studiomama Pallet Chair.

    Use natural and recycled materials. Weathered wood, old benches, and metal bins transformed into planters are gentle incursions on nature's domain.

    Trust Nature's Palette

      Gest exterior green paint ; Gardenista

    Above: Photograph by Meredith Swinehart.

    Use colors found in nature. As backdrops, gray, brown, white, and green will complement the plants and trees in the surrounding landscape. For our favorite shades of Green, Black, Gray, and White—as well as other colors—see our Palette & Paints archive.

    Blend In

    Carl Linnaeus garden Uppsala Sweden foxgloves ; Gardenista

    Above: Photograph of Carl Linnaeus' garden by Patrice Todisco via Landscape Notes.

    Take a minimalist approach to hardscaping elements such as paths and fences—"less is more"—to allow them to blend into their natural surroundings.

    Something Wild

    open air dinner party floating pallet Oslo ; Gardenista

    Above: Spotted in Oslo: The Ultimate Floating Dinner Party.

    Don't try to tame your garden. After blooms are spent, leave seed pods in place. Encourage volunteers to grow in cracks. If you feel an urge to hard prune something, try picnicking until it goes away.

    Go With the Flow

    Carl Linneaus garden Stockholm Sweden foxgloves ; Gardenista

    Above: Foxglove, anyone? These are clearly optimal growing conditions for digitalis. Photograph by Patrice Todisco via Landscape Notes.

    Learn from your plants. Take note of the ones that are flourishing in your garden; they are happy with the sunlight, soil, and water conditions. Let them spread as they want, and don't waste your time coddling weaklings or laggards. 

    Build a Privy

    Utedass outhouse privy ; Gardenista

    Above: Photograph by Annika Orre via Nyan.

    That's utedass to you, in Sweden. Traditionally, these detached buildings—wilderness toilets, if you will—sit near cabins in rural areas. Throwbacks to a simpler time, the privies often built of scrap wood and are austere in design, providing a reminder of how close to nature you can get if you want. For another modern version, see Outbuilding of the Week: A Stylish Swedish Outhouse.

    Live for the Light

    Gotland Sweden garden ; Gardenista

    Above: For more of this garden, see An Enchanted Seaside Garden in Sweden

    Take advantage of the light. In Scandinavia, the changeable northern light is an everyday fact of life. In your own garden, you can study the light to see how it moves across your property. What elements—outbuildings, second stories, tall trees—create shady pockets in the garden? Does the sunlight hit your garden differently in spring, summer, and fall? Plant accordingly.

    Be Brave in Winter

    Potting shed Julia's Vita Drommar ; Gardenista

    Above: Photograph via Julia's Vita.

    Don't give up gardening in the winter. Set up a potting shed or indoor area that's pleasant to work in when the weather is inhospitable. Whitewashed walls, open shelving, pegs to hold tools, bins of soil, and a few terra cotta pots should be enough to lure you into the dirt in January.

    Pamper Pelargoniums

    Pelargoniums houseplant Sweden ; Gardenista

    Above: Photograph via Stallmästeregården.

    Pot some pelargoniums. Equally happy as houseplants in winter and as patio companions in warm weather, pelargoniums are that rare thing: the true indoor-outdoor plant.

    For more Scandi style, see Steal This Look: A Danish Summer House With Outdoor Shower. And on Remodelista, see An Architect's Dream Commission in Norway.

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  • 07/28/15--06:00: 10 Easy Pieces: Wheelbarrows
  • When an artful Sussex trug made of ash wood strips is not big enough for the job, bring in the wheelbarrow. To transport potted plants, debris, gravel, and more, the trusted wheelbarrow is a utilitarian basic. On the spectrum of form and function, the wheelbarrow should fall somewhere closer to function, but that doesn't mean aesthetics need to step aside. Here are 10 favorites to satisfy both requirements.

     

    French Tan Wheelbarrow | Gardenista

    Above: The Bibox Wheelbarrow has a putty-colored basin, like a faded Army surplus tent, and durable metal frame; €99 at Bricozor in France.

    Jackson Professional Wheelbarrow | Gardenista

    Above: The Jackson Professional Tools Contractor's Wheelbarrow is the color of a French work jacket, and has wood handles and a blue steel basin; $214.99 at Sears.

    Ames Co. Poly Gray Wheelbarrow | Gardenista

    Above: The Ames Poly Wheelbarrow holds 6 cubic feet; it has ash handles and a gray poly bucket; $89.25 at The Tool Workshop.

    Yellow Wheelbarrow from Wheelbarrows Co. | Gardenista

    Above: The bright yellow Big Mucker Wheelbarrow has a plastic basin that can be used for equestrian use and compost alike; £59.99 at Wheelbarrows.

    Brentwood Wheelbarrow in Moss Green Poly | Gardenista

    Above: The Brentwood Single Wheel Moss Wheelbarrow has a pistachio-colored polyethylene bucket, a wooden frame, and holds 6 cubic feet of material; $281.99 at Hay Needle.

    Endurance Galvanized Wheelbarrow | Gardenista

    Above: The Endurance Galvanized Wheelbarrow is made in the UK and can be used for heavy duty commercial work; £74.95 at Wheelbarrows.

    La Mule Wooden Wheelbarrow from France | Gardenista

    Above: The Brouette from La Mule in France is made entirely of wood and has removable side partitions for carrying a wider load; €830 at La Mule.

    Ames Gray Landscaper Steel Wheelbarrow | Gardenista

    Above: The Ames Landscaper Wheelbarrow has a capacity of 6 cubic feet and is made from cloudy-gray steel; $94.99 at Ace Hardware.

    True Temper Wheelbarrow in Red | Gardenista

    Above: The True Temper Homeowner Wheelbarrow in classic red is $109.99 at Wayfair.

    Galvanized Steel Wheelbarrow | Gardenista

    Above: The Bristol DIY Garden Wheelbarrow is an ultra-light galvanized metal and bright orange combination; £29.95 from Wheelbarrows.

    Worx Aerocart Wheelbarrow | Gardenista

    Above: The durable Aerocart 8-in-1 Wheelbarrow is a wheelbarrow, yard cart, bag holder, dolly, extended dolly, cylinder carrier, rock/plant mover, and trailer tote; $159.80 at Worx.

    Stock up on more garden essentials with our posts:

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    The small terrace of Norwegian blogger Nina Holst is a soft blur of dove gray, designed for instant relaxation and light entertaining. Much of the furniture and accessories are sourced from the familiar Ikea, but it's Nina's Scandinavian intuition that gives the composition its unique quality. It's a look we'd like to emulate in our own backyard. Here are the key elements of Nina's budget-conscious Scandinavian terrace:

    Deck in Oslo, Norway from Stylizimo | Gardenista

    Above: Photograph by Nina Holst of Stylizimo.

    Deck in Oslo, Norway from Stylizimo | Gardenista

    Above: Photograph by Nina Holst of Stylizimo.

    Deck in Oslo, Norway from Stylizimo | Gardenista

    Above: Photograph by Nina Holst of Stylizimo.

    Deck in Oslo, Norway from Stylizimo | Gardenista

    Above: Photograph by Nina Holst of Stylizimo.

    Core Elements

    Terrain Basketweave Outdoor Sofa | Gardenista

    Above: The Basket Weave All Weather Wicker Sofa is built of a white-gray poly rattan woven over a lightweight aluminum frame. The sofa comes complete with Olefin outdoor fabric that can be washed with soap and water; $1,998 from Terrain. On the other end of the pricing spectrum, the woven polypropylene Arholma Sofa is $545 at Ikea.

    Terrain Basketweave Outdoor Chair | Gardenista

    Above: The Basket Weave All Weather Wicker Armchair to complete the set is $998 from Terrain.

    Ikea Flaster Table, Chairs, and Bench for Outdoors | Gardenista

    Above: Ikea's affordable outdoor set, the Falster Table, 2 Chairs, and Bench in weather-resistant polystyrene is $360.

    West Elm Square Slab Box Frame Coffee Table | Gardenista

    Above: The Square Slab Box Frame Coffee Table has a pale concrete top that sits on an open iron base; $349 at West Elm.

    Outdoor Fabrics

    Kookaburra Shade Sail in White | Gardenista

    Above: The Kookaburra Sun Sail Shade in Polar White is 16.5 feet of breathable woven polymer fabric is $75 at Amazon. For more sun shade inspiration, see our post Simple Summer Style: 10 Garden Ideas for a Backyard Canopy.

    Ikea Sillerup Triangle Rug | Gardenista

    Above: Ikea's graphic Sillerup Rug is right for the outdoors, fabricated from polypropylene with a latex backing; $129.

    Ikea Fardrup Gray Colored Sheepskin Rug | Gardenista

    Above: Dove gray-colored Fårdrup Faux Sheepskins are $12.99 each from Ikea.

    Accessories

    Outdoor Globe String Lights | Gardenista

    Above: A strand of 25 outdoor Globe String Lights has replaceable bulbs; $34.95 from Crate & Barrel. For a larger selection, see our post 10 Easy Pieces: Outdoor Holiday String Lights.

    Alseda Woven Floor Cushion from Ikea | Gardenista

    Above: Nina creates additional seating with two stacked woven banana fiber Alseda Stools from Ikea; $29.99 each. For a DIY idea, visit DIY: Color-Blocked Wicker Poufs.

    Terrain Stone Fire Pit | Gardenista

    Above: Terrain's Stone Base Fire Pit has a granite base and dark, cast iron bowl; $598.

    Serax Canvas Planter Bag | Gardenista

    Above: The Canvas Planter Bag from French company Serax is made of soft canvas, stiffened with a few coats of white paint; €12 each at Lili's.

    House Doctor Outdoor Lantern from France | Gardenista

    Above: House Doctor Outdoor Lanterns are €18 for the small and €22 for the large at French online shop Lili's.

    Plain Concrete Planter from Tasi Masi | Gardenista

    Above: A handmade Plain Concrete Planter is $55 from Tasi Masi, who specializes in concrete vases and planters. To make your own, see our post DIY on a Budget: $30 Mini Concrete Planters.

    For more Scandinavian outdoor design see our posts:

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